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About the FGG alliance

The Fair Green and Global (FGG) alliance is an alliance of six civil society organisations. Both ENDS is the lead agency, and other member organisations are: ActionAid, Clean Clothes Campaign, Milieudefensie (Friends of the Earth Netherlands), SOMO and Transnational Institute.

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The Fair Green & Global Alliance focuses on three leverage points, or Theories of Change (ToCs) - corporate conduct, trade and investment, and the financial system, in order to reach socially just, inclusive, environmentally and sustainable societies worldwide.

The Fair Green & Global Alliance focuses on three leverage points, or Theories of Change (ToCs) - corporate conduct, trade and investment, and the financial system, in order to reach socially just, inclusive, environmentally and sustainable societies worldwide.

We see a gap between the scope and impact of economic forces and actors, and the capacity of societies to manage their adverse consequences. Low- and Lower-Middle Income Countries (LLMICs) especially suffer from this governance gap. The FGG alliance, consisting of the six FGG-members, together with nearly 300 civil society organisation (CSOs) in LLMICs and key networks and network members, aims to overcome this gap.

Our approach is not necessarily sequential, since outcomes may appear simultaneously. Therefore, we have formulated our method with three theories of change.

ToC 1: Improved corporate conduct

FGG’s goal is to ensure that improved corporate conduct advances social justice, decent work and environmental sustainability.

We believe that corporations, including private banks, have a role in and responsibility for fighting poverty and injustice and promoting inclusive and sustainable development. This requires a fundamental change in corporate conduct, including changes to basic decisions about investment, buying practices and sourcing. Not just on paper, but in practice.

Through globalisation, corporations have acquired greater power and legal rights without a parallel increase in accountability. Acting within complex transnational structures, networks of business relationships, financing arrangements, and global supply chains, corporations can avoid responsibility for their conduct. We believe this corporate ‘governance gap’ must be closed for social and gender justice, decent work and environmental sustainability to prevail. This requires rules, regulations and enforcement, and improvements in corporate governance, business models and business practices, including the active promotion of sustainability, freedom of association throughout supply chains, and fostering local, vibrant, small-scale and sustainable businesses. It also requires creating an enabling environment in which human rights are respected.

ToC 2: Improved trade and investment

FGG’s goal is to ensure that trade and investment advances socially just, inclusive and environmentally sustainable development.

We believe that trade and investment can contribute significantly to economic opportunity and equality. Nevertheless, the current global trade and investment regime has helped create and exacerbate governance gaps that adversely affect society, expanding the rights of corporations while diminishing the policy options available to governments. Policies promoting trade and investment have overlooked the potentiality of negative impacts, putting them at odds with commitments on policy coherence for development (PCD). There is an urgent need to close these governance gaps and to increase policy coherence in general. We believe that this will redress the imbalance between the rights and obligations of corporations and the regulatory space available to governments to fulfil environmental and social objectives, including increased gender equality and respect for human rights.

ToC 3: Improved financial and tax systems

FGG’s third long-term goal is to ensure that financial systems, tax regimes and public financing practices advance socially just, inclusive and environmentally sustainable development.

We believe that financial and tax regimes can secure revenues and domestic resources for governments, promote equality and stability, and generate public financing that serves development goals. However, the current financial system has helped create governance gaps that adversely affect society, especially in LLMICs. There is a systematic tendency for financial resources (capital) to accumulate in the hands of a fairly limited number of private individuals, corporations and government institutions. In addition, international financial institutions, whilst pursuing development objectives, tend to marginalise human rights and environmental conditions and safeguards, investing in projects which at times are detrimental to poor communities, particularly women, and the ecosystems upon which they rely. FGG seeks to contribute to the goal of policy coherence for development by helping ensure that financial and tax policies—financial regulation, tax systems, and the functioning of (public) international financial institutions—are geared towards sustainable and inclusive development and equity within and across borders. National and international tax regimes also need to be reconfigured so that they contribute to economic and environmental justice, including by creating incentives for a systemic shift to a low carbon economy.

 

Our joint lobbying and advocacy strategies are based on the priorities and agendas of our partners. Over the years we have refined our strategy with respect to lobbying and advocacy, and we have now identified six intermediate steps (outcome areas) that will lead to improvements in corporate conduct, trade and investment, and financial and tax policies. The first three ‘preparatory’ steps relate directly to mutual capacity building; (A) an enabling environment, (B) capacities strengthened, and (C) alternatives developed. These steps form the preconditions for FGG partners and members to effectively jointly lobby and advocate, leading to the last three steps; (D) agenda setting, (E) policy change and (F) practice change.

To ensure ‘fair’ and ‘green’ development, the Alliance works with groups—NGOs, CSOs, community-based organisations (CBOs), communities, and individuals—that face challenges relating to labour and human rights, the use of and control over natural resources, and the global financial system.

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